Pavement Mojitos

You must be wondering what pavement mojitos are. They are not the ones that you drink after you passed out on a pavement. Wait a sec. They are almost. A little more than a year ago, we had gone to Cuba. Little did we know that Cuba Holidays was going to be about spending a lot of time on cobble stoned streets or pavements drinking mojitos.

Che and Fidel aside.Vintage cars aside. Rumba aside. Cigars aside. Cuba is about Mojitos.

Cuba is the birthplace of Mojitos, though this is a topic of much debate. The Mojito was a favorite drink of author Ernest Hemingway. Ernest Hemingway made the bar called La Bodeguita del Medio famous as he became one of its regulars and he wrote “My mojito in La Bodeguita, My daiquiri in El Floridita. ” This expression in English can still be read on the wall of the bar today, in his handwriting. And this is Havana’s most popular bar. This endorsement is good enough for me to believe Mojitos are Cuban. Any literary emotion sways me.

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Wiki defines a mojito – Traditionally, a mojito is a cocktail that consists of five ingredients: white rum, sugar (traditionally sugar cane juice), lime juice, sparkling water, and mint. Its combination of sweetness, refreshing citrus, and mint flavors is intended to complement the potent kick of the rum, and have made this clear highball a popular summer drink. The cocktail has a relatively low alcohol content (about 10 percent alcohol by volume).

While we reminisce on the Cuban holiday and roaming the streets of Havana with our friends Ernesto and Raquel from Argentina and Spain, I can’t help but think about what makes a Mojito so special. Well, I attempted my definition – Non-traditionally speaking, a mojito is a mix of refreshing conversation, intoxicated friends, unexpected sweetness and a potent kick that clearly combined together results in a highball of emotions on the street.

To Ernesto & Raquel – April 2012.

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To Roy & Picklu – August 2013 – Trying to recreate this in London in a bar next door.

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